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Your torso should move up and down through an arc of about 90 degrees. Va r i a t i o n Variable-Grip Dumbbell Decline Press Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated grip palms forward at the start. Outer section of the latissimus dorsi Secondary: Your hands should be directly in line with your forearms to minimize unneces- sary stress in your wrist joints. The book is systematically organized into muscle groups, so finding the exercises you need in order to build any muscle is easy. Anterior deltoid, biceps brachii Anatomic Focus upper chest Trajectory: Execution 1.

The lower the dumbbells descend, the more the chest muscle stretches. However, lowering the dumbbells too far can cause shoulder injury. Va r i a t i o n Variable-Grip Dumbbell Press Begin the exercise by holding a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated grip palms forward. Rotate the dumbbells during the press so that your palms face together neutral grip at lockout.

Hold a dumbbell in each hand directly above your chest, palms facing each other, arms out straight. Lower the dumbbells outward, bending your elbows slightly as the weight descends to chest level.

Raise the dumbbells back up and together. Anterior deltoid Anatomic Focus upper chest Trajectory: The fly exercise works best when the dumbbells are held with a neutral grip palms facing each other , but a pronated grip palms facing forward can be used as a variation. The lower the dumbbells descend, the greater the pectoral stretch.

However, too much stretch can cause injury to the muscle and the shoul- der joint. Va r i a t i o n Machine Fly Performing the machine fly described later in this chapter with the seat low and the handles at eye level will target the upper pectorals. With each hand, grasp a D-handle attached to the low pulleys on a cable machine. Stand upright midway between the weight stacks, facing forward. Raise your arms in a forward arc until the handles meet at head height.

Keeping your elbows stiff, lower the handles back to the starting position. Anterior deltoid Anatomic Focus Trajectory: Standing forward so that the pulleys are slightly behind you affords a better trajectory to target the pectoral muscles. Handles should be level with your chest. Raise your arms in an upward arc until the handles meet above your head. Keeping your elbows slightly bent, lower the handles back to the starting position level with your chest.

Anterior deltoid, biceps brachii Anatomic Focus upper chest Trajectory: Bend your elbows slightly during the descent to alleviate strain across the biceps.

The lower the handles descend, the greater the pectoral stretch. However, too much stretch can cause injury to the muscle and the shoulder joint. Lying on a flat bench, take a shoulder-width overhand grip on the bar. Lower the weight slowly until the bar touches the middle chest. Pectoralis major Secondary: Your torso should lie flat, and your shoulders and buttocks should contact the bench. Plant your feet firmly on the floor for stability.

If your lower back is arched or your buttocks rise off the bench, the focus shifts to the lower pectorals. Raising your feet off the floor by bending your knees may help target the middle chest, but stability and balance are compromised when your feet are mi d d l e c h e s t not in contact with the floor.

The ideal hand spacing is shoulder width or slightly wider. A narrow close grip emphasizes the inner pectorals and targets the triceps. A wider grip targets the outer section of the muscle and minimizes triceps contribution. The bar should move vertically up and down from the middle chest nipple area. Flare your elbows out as the bar is lowered to maximize pectoral isolation.

A shorter repetition terminating the press just before lockout keeps tension on the pectorals and reduces the amount of triceps assistance. An underhand supinated grip on the bar switches the focus to the triceps. Va r i a t i o n s Machine Chest Press Machines provide better stability and safety than the standard barbell bench press does.

A neutral grip thumbs up, palms facing each other isolates the pectorals better than a pronated grip palms forward. Close-Grip Bench Press Perform the exercise with hands spaced approximately 6 inches 15 cm apart. The narrow grip targets the inner pectorals and works the triceps. Lying on a flat bench, hold a dumbbell in each hand at chest level, palms facing forward. Press the dumbbells vertically upward until the elbows lock out.

Lower the dumbbells to the middle chest. Holding the dumbbells with palms facing forward pronated grip provides more stretch as the weight is lowered to the starting position. Holding the dumbbells with palms facing each other neutral grip allows a better contraction in the lockout position. Your torso should lie flat on the bench, and the dumbbells should mi d d l e c h e s t move vertically up and down from the middle chest nipple area.

To maximize pectoral isolation, flare your elbows out wide during the descent and touch the dumbbells together at lockout. Va r i a t i o n Variable-Grip Dumbbell Bench Press Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated grip palms forward at the start. Rotate the dumbbells as you press so that your palms face each other neutral grip at lockout.

Lie on a flat bench, holding a dumbbell in each hand. Begin with the dumb- bells directly above the middle chest, palms facing each other, arms out straight. Lower the dumbbells out wide, bending the elbows slightly as the weight descends to chest level.

Anterior deltoid Anatomic Focus mi d d l e c h e s t Grip: The fly exercise works best when the dumbbells are held with a neutral grip palms facing each other , but a pronated grip palms facing forward can also be used for variation. The lower the dumbbells descend, the greater the pectoral stretch, but also the greater the chance of injury. Raise your arms in an upward arc until the handles meet above your chest. Keeping your elbows slightly bent, lower the handles to the starting position level with your chest.

Anterior deltoid, biceps brachii Anatomic Focus mi d d l e c h e s t Trajectory: Chang- ing the angle to an incline will shift the focus toward the upper chest, whereas changing the angle to a decline will target the lower chest. Grab the vertical handles, elbows slightly bent. Squeeze the handles together until they touch in front of your chest. Let your arms move back to the starting position, keeping your elbows up. The fly exercise works best with a neutral grip palms facing each other , but a pronated grip palms facing forward can also be used for variation.

Keep your elbows stiff and slightly bent throughout the movement. The inner central portion of the pectoral muscle does most of the work as the handles are squeezed together. To emphasize the inner pecto- mi d d l e c h e s t rals, use a narrow range of motion, focusing on the squeeze position. Keep your elbows straight to achieve maximum squeeze. The emphasis switches to the outer pectorals when your hands move out wide. Do not allow the handles to pass behind the plane of your body or you will enter the injury zone.

Position the seat so the handles are level with your chest. To maximize pectoral isolation, keep your elbows high shoulder level during the movement.

When the seat is low and the handles are held high, the upper chest is emphasized. When the seat is high and the handles are held low, the lower chest is emphasized. Unlike dumbbell flys, in which the resistance varies during the lift, the machine fly affords a uniform resistance throughout the motion and is excellent for targeting the inner pectorals. Va r i a t i o n s Pec Deck Fly The pec deck fly is a similar exercise that uses elbow pads instead of handles. One-Arm Machine Fly Do this exercise using one arm at a time.

Lying on a decline bench, take a shoulder-width overhand grip on the bar. Lower the weight slowly until the bar touches your lower chest. Lower pectoralis major sternal head Secondary: Triceps brachii, anterior deltoid Anatomic Focus lower chest Trajectory: The decline angle determines trajectory. As the bench is tilted head- down and the decline gets steeper, the focus shifts progressively lower down the pectoral muscle.

The lower pectoral is best targeted at a decline of 20 to 40 degrees to the floor. Steeper declines shift the focus from the chest to the tri- ceps. The ideal hand spacing is shoulder width.

Wider grips target the outer section of the muscle, afford a greater stretch, and minimize triceps con- tribution. A narrow close grip targets the inner pectorals and requires more work from the triceps. Va r i a t i o n Machine Decline Press Performing the decline press on a machine, such as the Smith machine, affords better stability and safety. Lying on a decline bench, hold a dumbbell in each hand at chest level, palms facing forward.

Anterior deltoid, triceps brachii Anatomic Focus lower chest Grip: Dumbbells should move vertically up and down from the middle chest nipple area. Va r i a t i o n Variable-Grip Dumbbell Decline Press Hold a dumbbell in each hand with a pronated grip palms forward at the start. Rotate the dumb- bells as you press so that your palms face each other neutral grip at lockout.

Anterior deltoid, triceps brachii Anatomic Focus lower chest Trajectory: The fly exercise works best when the dumbbells are held with a neutral grip palms facing each other , but a pronated grip palms facing forward can also be used as a variation.

Va r i a t i o n Variable-Grip Dumbbell Fly Hold the dumbbells with a pronated grip palms forward at the bottom of the movement and then rotate the dumbbells during the lift so that your palms face each other neutral grip at the top of the movement. Squeeze the handles down and together until your hands touch in front of your waist.

Keep your elbows slightly bent. Slowly return to the starting position. Your torso should be upright or tilted forward slightly at the waist. The level at which your hands meet determines the focus on the muscle. A low trajectory, in which the handles meet in front of your hips or waist, targets the lowest fibers of the pectoral muscle.

A high trajectory, in which the handles meet at chest level, targets the midsection of the pectorals. Crossing your hands at the bottom of the movement increases the range of motion and targets the inner central portion of the pectorals.

Extending the starting position by allowing your hands to pass above shoulder or head height affords a greater stretch but also places unnecessary stress on the shoulder joint.

Va r i a t i o n Seated Crossover Newer machines allow you to perform this exercise while seated with a back support. Grab the parallel bars and support your body with your elbows locked straight.

Push yourself back up until your elbows lock out. The position of your torso affects the focus of the exercise. A slight forward tilt is better for targeting the pectorals, and the more you bend forward the harder you work the pectorals. An upright posture shifts the focus to the triceps, and the more you straighten your torso the more you involve the triceps.

Flare your elbows out as you descend to maximize pectoral isolation. A standard grip on the parallel bars with thumbs pointing forward works best when targeting the chest. A reverse grip with thumbs pointing backward shifts the focus to the triceps. Va r i a t i o n Machine Dip You can perform this exercise while seated on a machine. However, because most dip machines restrict torso motion, they tend to target the triceps more than the chest.

Functionally, and for bodybuilding purposes, the back is best considered in three sections that resemble triangular segments of a quilted blanket. The upper back is made up of a large triangular muscle called the trapezius.

It originates along the upper spine from the skull down to the last rib—that is, all the cervical and thoracic vertebrae. The upper fibers of the trapezius in the neck attach to the outer tip of the shoulder on the clavicle, acromion, and scapula shoulder blade. The middle and lower fibers of the trapezius in the upper back attach to the scapula. The upper trapezius elevates the scapula to shrug the shoulders and rotates the scapula to assist shoulder abduction.

The middle trapezius retracts the scapula, pulling the shoulders backward. The lower trapezius depresses the scapula downward. Underneath the trapezius are three muscles that anchor the scapula to the spine: The levator scapulae assists the upper trapezius to elevate the scapula.

The rhomboid major and rhom- boid minor work with the middle trapezius to retract the scapula. These scapular retractors lie under the trapezius and add muscular thickness to the upper back.

The middle back consists of the latissimus dorsi, a large fan-shaped muscle that arises from the lower half of the spinal column and the rear ridge of the pelvic bone posterior iliac crest. From its large origin, the latissimus dorsi converges into a band- like tendon that attaches to the upper humerus, next to the tendon of the pectoralis major.

When the latissimus dorsi contracts, movement takes place at the shoulder joint. The latissimus dorsi pulls the upper arm downward and backward shoulder extension ; hence, this muscle is targeted by pull-downs, pull-ups, and rows. The latissimus dorsi also pulls the arm in against the side of the body adduction. The lower back is made up of the erector spinae or sacrospinalis muscles that run the entire length of the spinal column. In the lumbar region, the erector spinae splits into three columns: These muscles are the pillars of strength in the lower back that stabilize the spine and extend the torso, arching the spine backward.

It is the sacrospinalis muscles that cause movements of the spine and torso. Exercises that target the back muscles include shrugs, pull-downs, pull-ups, rows, and lumbar extensions. The deadlift is a compound, multijoint exer- cise that involves all of the back muscles. Barbell Shrug Upper and Levator scapulae upper back middle trapezius Erector spinae: Keeping your arms stiff, shrug your shoulders as high as possible, pulling the bar vertically upward. Lower the bar slowly down to the starting position, stretching the trapezius.

Upper and middle trapezius Secondary: Levator scapulae, deltoid, erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , forearms wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus upper back Hand spacing: A shoulder-width or narrower grip on the bar emphasizes the trapezius.

A wider grip works the deltoid as well. Lift the bar straight up and down. Do not roll or rotate the shoulders. Performing the shrug while standing vertically upright hits the trapezius centrally.

Tilting the torso slightly back at the waist targets the upper trapezius in the neck, whereas leaning slightly forward targets the midsection of the muscle behind the shoulders. The higher the bar is raised, the harder the trapezius works. Va r i a t i o n s Rear Shrug Performing the exercise with the barbell behind your hips causes scapular retraction, pulling the shoulders backward to emphasize the middle fibers of the trapezius.

Machine Shrug Performing this exercise on a machine affords a choice of grips—pronated thumbs pointing in or neutral thumbs pointing forward.

A neutral grip emphasizes the upper trapezius in the neck, whereas a pronated grip targets the middle trape- zius in the back. Stand upright with a dumbbell in each hand, hands hanging at your sides. Keeping your arms straight, shrug your shoulders upward as high as possible. Lower the dumbbells back down to the starting position. Levator scapulae, deltoid, erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , forearms wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus upper back Grip: A neutral grip thumbs pointing forward emphasizes the upper trapezius in the neck, whereas a pronated grip thumbs pointing in targets the middle trapezius in the back.

Tilting your torso slightly back at the waist targets the upper trapezius, whereas leaning slightly forward targets the muscle lower down the neck.

Performing the shrug while standing vertically upright hits the upper and middle sections of the trapezius. The higher the weight is raised, the harder the trapezius works.

The farther the dumbbells are lowered, the greater the stretch at the bottom of the movement. Va r i a t i o n Retracting Shrug Hold the dumbbells in front of your body using a pronated grip. Squeeze your shoulder blades together during the shrug, finishing with the dumbbells at your sides in a neutral grip. During the movement the dumbbells are lifted upward scapular elevation , working the upper trapezius, and backward scapular retraction , working the middle trapezius.

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Spinalis Wrist and Longissimus finger Iliocostalis extensors Start position. Pull the bar vertically upward until it reaches your chin, raising your elbows as high as possible.

Lower the bar slowly back down to the starting position. Trapezius, deltoid Secondary: Levator scapulae, erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , forearms wrist extensors, finger extensors Anatomic Focus upper back Hand spacing: Performing the row while standing vertically upright hits the trapezius centrally.

To emphasize the trapezius not the deltoid , raise the bar close to your body during the exercise. However, raising the bar higher also increases the risk of shoulder-impingement pain. Spinalis Longissimus Iliocostalis Execution 1. Trapezius, posterior deltoid Secondary: Levator scapulae, erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , supraspinatus, forearms wrist extensors, finger extensors Anatomic Focus upper back Resistance: Using a Smith machine provides a single plane of vertical motion that can help focus your effort during the exercise.

A shoulder-width or narrower grip on the bar emphasizes the trapezius, whereas a wider grip works the deltoid as well. Va r i a t i o n Cable Upright Row Perform this exercise using a straight bar attached to the low pulley of a cable machine. See chapter 1 for instructions.

Sit at a cable machine. Grab the handles attached to a low pulley using a neutral thumbs up grip, with your arms extended in front of your body.

Pull the handles high toward your chest, keeping your spine straight. Return the handles to the starting position. Middle and lower trapezius, latissimus dorsi Secondary: Rhomboid major, rhomboid minor, posterior deltoid Anatomic Focus upper back Hand spacing: Spacing your hands farther apart targets the outer trapezius, whereas placing your hands closer together focuses on the inner portion of the trapezius. A pronated overhand grip tends to target the upper and middle trapezius, whereas a neutral grip thumbs up hits the middle and lower trapezius.

A supi- nated underhand grip switches the focus to the latissimus dorsi. To target the trapezius, pull the handles or bar through a high trajectory toward the chest. A low trajectory toward the abdomen works the latissimus dorsi. Keep your back straight and your torso upright. Pull your elbows up and back as far as possible. Squeeze your shoulder blades together to maximize muscle contraction. Take an overhand grip on the high bar with hands 6 inches 15 cm wider than shoulder width.

Pull the bar down to your upper chest, squeezing the latissimus dorsi. Return the bar to the overhead starting position. Outer section of the latissimus dorsi Secondary: Posterior deltoid, lower trapezius, rhomboid major, rhomboid minor Anatomic Focus mi d d l e b a c k Hand spacing: As the hand spacing gets wider, the focus shifts to the outermost section of the latissimus dorsi under the armpit.

This portion of the muscle creates width across the back. An overhand pronated grip works best for this exercise. Grasping the angled section at the outer edges of the handlebar affords a better contraction in the latissimus dorsi. When your torso is upright, the bar is pulled vertically downward using shoulder adduction, which emphasizes the outer latissimus. Leaning your torso back about 30 degrees from vertical creates a trajectory that uses shoulder extension, which emphasizes the inner lower latissimus.

To maximize range of motion, stretch the latissimus dorsi at the top position and squeeze the latissimus dorsi at the bottom of the movement by pulling the elbows down and back as far as possible. Va r i a t i o n s Handlebar Pull-Down The angled ends of a wide-grip pull-down bar offer several advantages over a straight bar: Behind-the-Neck Pull-Down Pulling the bar down behind the neck is a less favorable trajectory that can cause injury to the shoulder joint.

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Inner section of the latissimus dorsi Secondary: Lower trapezius, rhomboid major, rhomboid minor, posterior deltoid, biceps brachii Anatomic Focus mi d d l e b a c k Hand spacing: As the hand spacing gets narrower, the focus shifts to the innermost section of the latissimus dorsi, generating thickness and depth in the middle back.

This exercise uses shoulder extension rather than adduction. The arms are pulled down and backward, which emphasizes the inner lower sections of the latissimus dorsi. Leaning your torso back about 30 degrees from vertical improves trajectory and helps isolate the latissimus dorsi. Do not lean back too far or pull the weight down with momentum.

Stretch the latissimus dorsi at the top position and squeeze the latissimus dorsi at the bottom of the movement by pulling the elbows down and back as far as possible. Va r i a t i o n Handlebar Variation Handlebar attachments allow a neutral grip palms facing together.

This hand posi- tion is midway between a pronated overhand grip and a supinated underhand grip. An overhand grip targets the outer latissimus dorsi, an underhand grip isolates the inner latissimus dorsi, and a neutral grip hits the muscle centrally.

Take an overhand grip on the pull-up bar with hands 6 inches 15 cm wider than shoulder width and arms extended. Pull your torso upward until your chin touches the bar. Lower your torso slowly down to the starting position. Pull-ups are similar to pull-downs except that the resistance provided by your own body weight is not easily adjusted. Resistance may be added using a weighted belt, but clearly your body weight cannot be reduced. As the hand spacing gets wider, the focus shifts to the outermost section of the latissimus dorsi at the armpit.

This portion of the muscle creates mi d d l e b a c k width across the back. An underhand supinated grip may be used during a close-grip pull-up.

A neutral grip also may be used on some equipment see variations. Because the torso remains vertical during the movement, pull-ups primar- ily use shoulder adduction and therefore tend to work the outer latissimus dorsi.

To maximize range of motion, stretch the latissimus dorsi at the bottom position and squeeze the latissimus dorsi at the top of the movement by pulling the elbows down and back. Crossing one foot over the other and slightly bending the knees minimizes body swing during the movement.

Va r i a t i o n s Close-Grip Pull-Up An underhand supinated grip on the bar facilitates a closer hand spacing, emphasizing shoulder extension rather than adduction. As the hand spacing gets narrower, the focus shifts to target the inner lower section of the latissimus dorsi. With an underhand grip, the greater contribution from the biceps brachii provides added strength.

Handlebar Pull-Up The handlebar attachment on some equipment allows a neutral grip with palms facing each other. This hand position is midway between a pronated overhand grip and a supinated underhand grip. Whereas a wide overhand grip targets the outer latissi- mus dorsi and a close underhand grip isolates the inner latissimus dorsi, a neutral grip hits the muscle centrally.

Behind-the-Neck Pull-Up Pulling up with the back of your neck touching the bar is a less favorable trajectory that may cause irritation to the shoulder joint. Take an overhand shoulder-width grip on the barbell with your arms extended. Bend your torso forward 45 degrees to the floor. Lower the bar down to the starting position. Latissimus dorsi Secondary: Spacing your hands shoulder-width apart or closer targets the central inner section of the latissimus dorsi, whereas a wider grip targets the outer latissimus dorsi.

An underhand supinated grip on the bar facilitates a closer hand spacing, emphasizing shoulder extension and targeting the central inner section of the mi d d l e b a c k latissimus dorsi.

With an underhand grip, a greater contribution from the biceps brachii provides added strength during the row. Pulling the bar up higher toward the chest targets the upper latis- simus dorsi and trapezius.

Pulling the bar through a lower trajectory to touch the abdomen targets the lower latissimus dorsi. Keep your spine straight. Never round the lower back in an attempt to lower the bar farther because doing so will provoke injury. Va r i a t i o n T-Bar Row This variation requires less effort to stabi- lize body position during the movement because one end of the bar pivots at a fixed point on the floor.

Stand facing the loaded end with feet positioned on either side of the bar. With your spine straight and knees slightly bent, lift the loaded end using the T-bar attachment. Some row apparatuses provide an inclined chest pad that supports the torso and minimizes load across the lower spine. Grasp a dumbbell in one hand with your palm facing in. Rest the opposite hand and knee on a bench, keeping your spine straight and just above par- allel to the floor. Pull the dumbbell vertically upward alongside your torso, raising your elbow as high as possible.

Lower the dumbbell down to the starting position. Trapezius, rhomboid major, rhomboid minor, posterior deltoid, erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , biceps brachii Anatomic Focus mi d d l e b a c k Grip: A neutral grip with the dumbbell parallel to the torso works best. The dumbbell will tend to jam against your torso if a pronated or supinated grip is attempted. Pulling the dumbbell toward the chest works the upper latissimus dorsi and lower trapezius. Raising the dumbbell through a lower trajectory toward the abdomen targets the lower latissimus dorsi.

Maximize the range of motion by stretching the latissimus dorsi at the bottom position and raising the elbow as high as possible at the top of the movement. Supporting your torso on the bench reduces stress through the spine. Va r i a t i o n One-Arm Cable Seated Row Grab the handle of a low pulley with one hand, using a neutral thumb-up grip. Pull the handle high toward your chest, keeping your spine straight. Return the handle to the starting posi- tion with the arm extended.

Rowing one arm at a time allows you to pull the elbow back farther, thereby maximizing muscle contraction in the latissimus dorsi. Grab the handles of the machine with your arms extended in front of your body. If the machine has a chest pad, support your torso against the pad. Pull the handles toward your upper abdomen, keeping your spine straight. Return the weight to the starting position. Trapezius, rhomboid major, rhomboid minor, posterior deltoid Anatomic Focus mi d d l e b a c k Hand spacing: Spacing your hands farther apart targets the outer latissimus dorsi, whereas spacing your hands closer together isolates the inner latissimus dorsi.

A pronated overhand grip tends to target the upper and outer latissimus dorsi, a neutral thumbs up grip hits the central section of the back, and a supi- nated underhand grip works the lower latissimus dorsi. As the grip changes from pronation to neutral to supination, the elbows move progressively closer to the sides of your body.

Pulling the handles through a high trajectory toward the chest targets the upper latissimus dorsi and trapezius, whereas a lower trajectory toward the abdomen targets the lower latissimus dorsi.

Adjust the seat height to change trajectory. Raising the seat creates a low trajectory; lowering the seat provides a high trajectory. Pull your elbows back as far as possible and squeeze your shoulder blades together to maximize muscle contraction. Load across the spine is reduced when the torso is supported against a chest pad. Gluteus Spinalis maximus Longissimus lower back Hamstrings: Lie facedown with your hips supported on the lumbar extension bench and your ankles secured under the pads.

Begin with your torso hanging down, bent 90 degrees at the waist. Raise your upper body until your torso is just above parallel to the floor. Erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis Secondary: Latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, hamstrings semitendinosus, semi- membranosus, biceps femoris Anatomic Focus Lower back Hand position: Hands may be interlocked behind your lower back or folded across your chest.

Add resistance by holding a weight plate against the front of your chest. You can perform the movement at an incline see variations. Your torso should move up and down through an arc of about 90 degrees. Avoid hyperextending your spine. The erector spinae muscles stabilize and straighten the spine, while the gluteus maximus and hamstrings generate hip extension. Va r i a t i o n s Incline Lumbar Extension Performing the movement at an incline with the hips supported high and the ankles closer to the floor makes the exercise easier.

The disadvantage is that the inclined position shifts the focus away from the lumbar muscles onto the buttocks and hamstrings. Machine Lumbar Extension Perform the exercise while seated on a lumbar extension machine that provides variable resistance. To avoid injury, do not flex the spine too far for- ward or extend too far backward.

Biceps femoris Semitendinosus Vastus lateralis Semimembranosus Execution 1. Take a shoulder-width overhand grip on the barbell with arms extended. Squat down, bending the knees and hips. Slowly lower the bar back to the floor by bending at the knees and hips. Erector spinae iliocostalis, longissimus, spinalis , gluteus maximus, hamstrings semitendinosus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris Secondary: Trapezius, latissimus dorsi, quadriceps rectus femoris, vastus latera- lis, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius , forearms wrist flexors, finger flexors lower back Anatomic Focus Hand spacing: Hands should be spaced shoulder-width apart so that the arms hang vertically and the hands pass along the outer thighs.

An over—under grip with one palm facing forward and the other facing back prevents the bar from rolling. Position your feet directly below your hips with toes pointing straight ahead. The bar should travel straight up and down and stay close to the body. Lift the barbell from the floor to the tops of your thighs, keeping your arms extended and your elbows stiff. During this movement, the erector spinae muscles stabilize and straighten the spine while the gluteus maximus and hamstrings generate hip extension.

Keep the spine straight throughout the movement. Do not round your lower back forward or extend the spine too far backward. Va r i a t i o n s Barbell Stiff-Legged Deadlift Performing the deadlift with your legs stiff shifts the focus from the lower back to the buttocks and hamstrings.

See chapter 5 for instructions. Sumo-Style Deadlift Performing the lift with a stance wider than hip-width places the emphasis on the thigh muscles. Biceps femoris Semitendinosus Semimembranosus Execution 1. Bend forward at the waist and lower the bar downward, keeping your spine straight and elbows stiff. Lift the bar back up to the starting position.

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Trapezius, latissimus dorsi, quadriceps rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius lower back Anatomic Focus Resistance: A Smith machine provides a single plane of vertical motion that can help focus your effort during the exercise. A slight bend in the knees helps with execution.

Do not round the lower back forward or extend the spine too far backward. Move the bar from hip level to down beyond the knees and back up again, keeping your arms extended and your elbows stiff. Va r i a t i o n Cable Pull-Through Stand facing away from a low pulley and perform the lift using a short bar with the cable passing between your legs. Stand upright with a barbell resting across your shoulders. Keeping your spine straight and knees stiff straight or slightly bent , bend forward at the waist until your torso is just above parallel to the floor.

Raise your torso back to the upright position. Latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, hamstrings semitendinosus, semi- membranosus, biceps femoris Anatomic Focus lower back Grip: Place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart using an overhand grip to secure the barbell across your shoulders.

A slight bend in the knees helps execution. Keep your spine straight and your head up, and avoid bend- ing your torso below parallel to the floor.

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Va r i a t i o n Machine Lift Perform this lift while seated, using a pad across your upper back to provide resis- tance. The upper arm consists of one bone, the humerus, whereas the forearm consists of two bones, the radius located on the thumb side and ulna located on the little-finger side.

The elbow is a hinge joint formed at the junction of the humerus, radius, and ulna. Two movements occur at the elbow joint: During elbow flexion, the forearm moves toward the upper arm. During extension, the forearm moves away from the upper arm.

Movement also takes place in the forearm when the radius rotates around the ulna. Supination palm up and pronation palm down take place between the radioulnar joints.

The wrist joint is the junction between the lower end of the forearm bones and the small bones in the hand. Biceps Brachii As its name suggests, the biceps brachii muscle has two heads. The short head attaches to the coracoid process, and the long head arises from above the glenoid of the shoulder joint.

The two-headed muscle passes down alongside the humerus and attaches about 1. The biceps brachii causes flexion at the elbow joint, such as when raising the hand toward the face. The biceps brachii also causes supination of the forearm, such as when rotating the hand so that the palm faces up. In addition to the biceps brachii, two other muscles flex bend the elbow: The brachialis muscle lies deep beneath the biceps brachii, arising from the lower half of the humerus and attaching to the ulna bone just below the elbow joint.

The brachialis lifts the ulna at the same time that the biceps brachii lifts the radius. The brachioradialis muscle arises from the outer aspect of the lower end of the humerus and then travels down the forearm to attach to the radius just above the wrist joint. Triceps Brachii The triceps brachii muscle has three heads, or sections. The long head arises from beneath the glenoid fossa of the shoulder joint, the lateral outer head arises from the outer surface of the humerus, and the medial inner head arises from the medial and rear surfaces of the humerus.

All three heads fuse at their lower ends to form a single tendon that attaches behind the elbow joint onto the olecranon process of the ulna bone. The triceps brachii is the only muscle that straightens the elbow joint, whereas three muscles biceps brachii, brachialis, and brachioradialis bend the elbow.

All three heads of the triceps muscle cross the elbow joint, but the long head also crosses beneath the shoulder joint. Forearm The forearm is a mass of 20 muscles. It has two separate muscle compartments: The fleshy muscle portions of almost all these muscles are located in the upper two- thirds of the forearm. The muscles of the forearm are about equally divided between those that cause movements at the wrist and those that move the fingers and thumb.

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The wrist flex- Ulna Biceps brachii long head Radius Biceps brachii short head Brachialis Humerus Scapula Brachioradialis Extensor carpi radialis longus Extensor carpi radialis brevis Extensor carpi ulnaris Extensor digitorum a Figure 4. The superficial group of wrist flexors and extensors cross both the wrist and elbow joints, so therefore have a greater stretch when wrist curls are performed with the elbow joint straight. The wrist flexors are the palmaris longus, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris.

The wrist exten- sors are extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis, and extensor carpi ulnaris. The finger flexors are the flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, and flexor pollicis longus. The finger extensors are the extensor digitorum, extensor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis, and extensor indicis. Supination, or rotating the hand so the palm faces up, is performed by the supi- nator and biceps brachii muscles.

Pronation, or rotating the hand so the palm faces down, is performed by the pronator teres and pronator quadratus. Curl the bar up to shoulder level by bending your elbows. Lower the bar back down to the starting position. Biceps brachii Secondary: A wide grip focuses effort on the inner biceps brachii short head , whereas a narrow grip works the outer biceps brachii long head.

With a straight bar, the underhand grip is fixed in supination palms facing up. The grip may be adjusted using an EZ bar see variation. The bar should move up and down in an arc close to the body. To iso- late the biceps brachii, motion should occur at the elbows and not the shoulders. Biceps Range of motion: Stopping a few degrees short of full elbow extension keeps tension on the biceps brachii as the barbell is lowered.

Stand upright with the spine straight. Tilting the torso cheats the bar upward with momentum: Leaning slightly forward makes the initial phase of the curl easier, and leaning slightly backward helps complete the final phase of the repetition.

The hands switch from the fully supinated palms facing up grip to a less supinated, nearly neutral palms facing in grip. This hand position emphasizes the outer long head of the biceps brachii and the brachialis and is less strenuous on the wrist joints. Sit on the edge of a weight bench, both feet planted on the floor. One arm at a time, curl the dumbbell up toward your shoulder, rotating your hand so your palm faces upward. Lower the dumbbell back down to the starting position and repeat with the opposite arm.

Brachialis, brachioradialis, anterior deltoid, forearm muscles wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus Grip: The dumbbell curl works the biceps brachii in two ways: Hence, to maximize contraction of the biceps brachii, supinate the hand palm facing up as the dumbbell is raised.

Instead of grasping the dumbbell in the middle of the bar, slide your palm over so your thumb rests against the inside of the plate. This grip change increases the load on the biceps brachii during supination, activating more muscle fibers when the dumbbell is rotated. Position your torso upright with your spine straight.

Tilting the torso cheats the weight upward with momentum: Use a full range of motion at the elbow. Va r i a t i o n s Dumbbell Standing Curl This exercise can be performed in a standing position, but this requires muscular effort in the legs. The seated version of this exercise affords better focus.

Dumbbell Incline Curl Performing this exercise while seated on an incline bench helps focus effort on the lower portion of the biceps brachii, near the elbow. Sit on the edge of a bench.

Place your free hand on your other thigh. Curl the dumbbell up toward your shoulder by bending at the elbow. Lower the dumbbell back down to the starting position. Brachialis, brachioradialis, forearm muscles wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus Grip: An underhand grip places the hand in supination and thereby maximizes Biceps contraction of the biceps brachii. The position of the upper arm relative to the floor changes the focus of effort. When the arm is vertical shoulder directly above the elbow , resistance increases as the dumbbell is raised and effort is focused on the upper biceps brachii peak.

When the arm is at an inclined angle elbow in front of the shoulder , resistance is maximal at the start, so effort targets the lower section of the biceps brachii at the elbow. Resting the upper arm against the thigh prevents movement at the shoulder and is an excellent way to isolate the biceps brachii. The torso, supported by your free hand on the opposite thigh, should remain motionless. Facing the weight stack, grasp the short bar attached to a low pulley using an underhand grip with arms straight.

Curl the bar up toward your shoulders by bending at the elbows. A grip that is wider than shoulder width focuses effort on the inner biceps brachii short head , whereas a narrow grip works the outer biceps brachii long head.

Using an EZ bar, the grip switches from the fully supinated position to a less supinated, nearly neutral palms facing in grip. This hand position is less strenuous on the wrist joint and tends to emphasize the outer long head of Biceps the biceps brachii and the brachialis. Fixing your elbows against your sides prevents movement at the shoulder and is an excellent way to isolate the biceps brachii. Unlike barbell or dumbbell curls, in which the resistance varies during the lift, the cable pulley provides uniform resistance throughout the movement.

Va r i a t i o n s High-Pulley Curl Standing midway between the pul- leys on a cable machine, grasp the D-handles attached to two high pulleys using an underhand grip. Holding your arms at shoulder level, curl the handles toward your head. This version emphasizes the long head of the biceps brachii and works the biceps brachii peak. One-Arm Cable Curl Perform this exercise with one arm at a time using a D-handle attached to the low pulley of a cable machine.

Sitting with your upper arms resting on the preacher bench, take a shoulder- width underhand grip on the bar with your arms out straight. Curl the bar up toward your shoulders.

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Lower the weight back down to the starting position. Brachialis, brachioradialis, forearm muscles wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus Hand spacing: A wide grip focuses effort on the inner biceps brachii short head , Biceps whereas a narrow grip works the outer biceps brachii long head. You may adjust the grip using an EZ bar see variation.

When the upper arms are supported at an inclined angle, resistance is maximal at the start, so effort is targeted on the lower section of the biceps brachii near the elbow. Resting the upper arms on the bench prevents movement at the shoulders and thereby helps isolate the biceps brachii. Adjust the seat height so that your armpit is snug against the upper edge of the pad.

Va r i a t i o n EZ-Bar Preacher Curl Using an EZ bar, the grip switches from the fully supinated palms facing up position to a less supinated, nearly neutral palms facing in grip. This hand position tends to focus effort on the outer long head of the biceps brachii and the brachialis muscle and is less strenuous on the wrist joints. Muscles Involved Biceps Primary: Brachialis, brachioradialis, forearm muscles wrist flexors, finger flexors Anatomic Focus Resistance: Performing the exercise one arm at a time with a dumbbell improves focus and isolation.

An underhand palm facing up grip places the hand in supination and thereby maximizes contraction of the biceps brachii. When the upper arm is supported at an inclined angle, resistance is maximal at the start, so effort is targeted on the lower section of the biceps brachii near the elbow. Resting the upper arm on the bench prevents movement at the shoulder and thereby helps isolate the biceps brachii. Stopping a few degrees short of full elbow extension keeps tension on the biceps brachii as the weight is lowered.

Grasp the bar using a shoulder-width underhand grip, with your elbows resting on the pad and your arms out straight. Curl the bar toward your shoulders by bending at the elbow. Return the bar to the starting position. An angled handlebar is less strenuous on the wrist joints than a straight bar.

An incline arm pad focuses effort on the lower portion of the biceps brachii. Effort is focused on the lower biceps brachii during the ini- tial phase of the curl, then switches to the middle biceps brachii peak as the weight is raised. Unlike barbell or dumbbell curls, in which the resistance varies during the lift, the machine provides uniform resistance throughout the movement.

Va r i a t i o n s Machine Flat-Pad Curl In contrast to the trajectory of an incline arm pad, the trajectory of a flat, horizontal arm pad focuses effort on the peak of the biceps brachii. One-Arm Machine Curl Performing this exercise with one arm at a time improves focus and isolation.

Facing the weight stack, take a shoulder-width overhand grip on a short bar attached to the high pulley. Begin with the bar at chest level, with your elbows bent a little more than 90 degrees. Keeping your upper arms stiff, push the bar down until your elbows lock out. Triceps brachii Secondary: Deltoid, forearm muscles wrist extensors Anatomic Focus Hand spacing: A wide grip focuses effort on the inner triceps brachii long head , triceps whereas a narrow grip focuses effort on the outer triceps brachii lateral head.

Using the straight bar, a pronated palms down grip emphasizes the outer lateral head of the triceps brachii, whereas a supinated palms up grip focuses effort on the inner long head. A V-shaped bar switches the hands into a neutral thumbs up grip that equally targets all three heads of the triceps brachii.

When the upper arms are perpendicular to the floor, the outer triceps brachii lateral head contributes to the movement. If you perform the exercise with your arms raised parallel to the floor, effort is focused on the inner triceps brachii long head. Fixing the upper arms against your sides prevents movement at the shoulders and is an excellent way to isolate the triceps brachii.

Motion should occur through the elbow only. Unlike barbell or dumbbell exercises, in which the resistance varies during the lift, the cable provides a uniform resistance throughout the movement. Standing upright with the spine straight is the standard position. Leaning the torso slightly forward at the waist provides better stability when using heavier weights. Va r i a t i o n s Rope Push-Down The rope attachment affords a forcible pronation at the wrist, which targets the outer lateral head of the triceps brachii.

Reverse-Grip Push-Down A reverse underhand grip focuses effort on the inner long head of the triceps brachii. One-Arm Push-Down Performing this exercise with one arm at a time while hold- ing a D-handle, using either an overhand or underhand grip, focuses effort and improves isolation. Grasp the parallel bars and lift yourself until your arms are fully extended. Keep your torso upright. Push yourself back up, straightening your arms until your elbows lock out.

A wide grip focuses effort on the inner triceps brachii long head , whereas a narrow grip focuses effort on the outer triceps brachii lateral head. The standard grip palms facing each other and thumbs forward hits all three heads of the triceps brachii and emphasizes the inner long head.

Reversing the grip so that the palms face outward and the thumbs point back switches most of the effort to the outer triceps brachii long head. Keeping your elbows close to your sides helps isolate the triceps brachii. Flaring your elbows out wide allows the chest muscles to assist. To isolate the triceps brachii, keep motion at the shoulders to a minimum.

Movement should occur primarily at the elbows. To focus effort on the triceps brachii, keep your body upright. Leaning forward makes the chest muscles do more work. Resistance is provided by your body weight and is not easily adjusted.

You can add resistance by attaching a weighted belt around your hips. Va r i a t i o n Machine Dip Performing this exercise while seated in a triceps push-down dip machine, on which the resistance is adjustable, makes it easier to focus your effort on the triceps brachii.

All the tips mentioned for the dip also apply to the machine variation. Bend at the elbows and lower the bar until it touches your forehead. Push the bar upward until your elbows lock out. A wide grip emphasizes the inner triceps brachii long head , whereas a narrow grip targets the outer triceps brachii lateral head.

Keep the elbows close and do not allow them to flare out to the sides. Using a straight bar, you may perform this exercise with an overhand pro- nated grip or an underhand supinated grip. Using an EZ bar or dumbbells see variation requires a neutral grip. An overhand grip works the inner long head of the triceps brachii, an underhand grip emphasizes the outer lateral triceps head, and a neutral grip works all three heads.

The vertical position of the arm stretches the inner long head of the triceps brachii, so this exercise targets this section of the muscle. Lowering the bar beyond the forehead toward the bench generates a greater stretch in the long head, favoring its contraction during the movement.

Keep your elbows pointing up and upper arms vertical.

Do not lower the bar toward your face or chin; this causes the elbows to drop and allows the deltoid and pectoral muscles to assist in the movement.

To isolate the triceps brachii, motion should occur only at the elbows, not at the shoulders. Va r i a t i o n s Dumbbell Lying Triceps Extension Perform this exercise with a dumbbell in each hand, moving both arms simultane- ously. Your thumbs should point toward your face neutral grip.

Reverse Grip Lying Triceps Extension Perform this exercise using a reverse supinated grip on the bar to emphasize the outer lateral head of the triceps brachii. Deltoid, forearm muscles wrist flexors, wrist extensors Anatomic Focus Hand spacing: A wide grip emphasizes the inner triceps brachii long head , triceps whereas a narrow grip targets the outer triceps brachii lateral head.

Keep the elbows close together and do not allow them to flare outward. Using a straight bar, this exercise requires an overhand pronated grip. Also no other exercise seems to develop the frontal thigh muscles quadriceps and the rear thigh muscle hamstrings quite well as regular barbell squats even though there are many sophisticated looking isolation thigh exercise machines available today.

You must have these so either build a good pair or buy them. Right from the beginning! The best way to get to like them is to do them right. Boots with a heal means you will be squatting with approx. Whether you need a four or six inch width belt is entirely up to you. This too is a must when squatting because it helps to support your back. It also reminds you to keep your back flat.

Most lifters require this degree of elevation and some others with rather longer bone lengths may require even two inches! Although individuals bone lengths and leverages very you should experiment to determine if you require boots without heels. If you have plans of becoming a powerlifter you will eventually find yourself using a fairly wide toes pointed out foot position. Stand with your heels approx. Strap the belt as tightly as you can around your waist and then bend underneath the bar with your right leg in front of your left.

Let the bar rest on the lower part of your trapezius muscles. From here you must now choose your feet width position. This way you will always have the rack in front of you which means you only have to step forward to replace the bar again. Now breathe in taking the weight from the squat racks.

As this foot position often varies from lifter to lifter we recommend the following position which is compromise for developing the thigh muscles as well as building strength and power. It is not advisable to get into the habit of holding your breathe too long when squatting.

When you reach this position start to slowly breathe out again and at the same time smartly come back to the starting position. From this position you are ready to squat! Keeping your back flat at all times and your head up with your eyes fixed to an imaginary object at eye level. Here are three different squat routines which you can use. Rest two minutes and then place all the weight on the bar that you can and do or attempt to do as many reps as possible. Rest again and increase the weight by ten to twenty pounds.

Wednesday and Friday. Train until you cannot do another rep. Do a good set of at least 15 reps do more if you can do them! Use a weight approx. Rest another two minutes and do a final set with a 15 to 20pound weight reduction. Rest a few minutes and increase the weight.

Thursday and Saturday is ideal. The number of reps depends on your starting size and strength. But always have someone standing by to help you with the weight. Your shoulders and chest should feel nice and pumped after these three sets. Alternated for 2 sets of 10 reps.

Do a warm-up set of curls and pushdowns to warm-up your arms. Rest two minutes and do a final set using the same weight. Use 15 reps and ten reps as guidelines only. Stay on this routine as long as you are making progress. When you can do more than 10 reps increase the poundage by 5 pounds next workout day.

Sit at the end of an exercise bench holding a barbell at your shoulders. If you are doing these squats correctly you should be huffing and puffing very hard at the end of each set. Smoothly press it to arms length without using your back muscles too much. When all else has failed a short period of heavy breathing squats can almost perform miracles!

After trying every method under the sun to gain many men have been happily surprised to find that they have gained more bodyweight in one month following a breathing squat routine than they did for several months. Perform your squats as follows on three alternate days of the week.

But the main secret is in the breathing. One secret behind the success of the breathing squat system is to gradually add more and more weight to your squat bar which intensifies your training. You must learn the technique of very heavy forceful breathing which in turn triggers off the growth mechanism of the body resulting in unbelievable weight gains all over the body. Now pile all the weights on the bar that you would normally do 10 reps with.

Blow out as much air as you possible can and then immediately breathe in and stick your chest out again. Take a huge breath by filling your lungs and at the same time stick your chest out as far as possible.

Remember you are taking quite a few seconds rest between each rep approx. You should literally wiped out after this one set of twenty reps. Take the bar from the squat racks and assume the position mentioned previously. At the end of your twentieth rep you should be absolutely gasping. Breathe out once more and then finally take another breath and go into a squat on that breathes. Hold a piece of sponge or a towel over the top half of your back and place the bar over this.

Force yourself to get the twentieth rep no matter what. This will stop the bar from digging into you because twenty rep squats don in breathing style take quite some time. About one inch thickness of padding should suffice. Now it will often happen that you will think you are not going to be able to get the full twenty repos.

Breathe out on the way back and then go through the three rep breathing sequence again as just outlined. But remember your gains will be entirely the result of how hard you work this one set. Prior to your one set of breathing squats do one set of 12 reps to failure on the following exercise.

So the whole routine looks like this: Training for the rest of the body whilst on this breathing squat routine should be just enough to stimulate growth without overtraining. Raw milk also contains vitamins. So therefore. There are also several coliform families of bacteria. The rest are actually beneficial for your gut.

High omega-3 and low omega-6 ratios. So if you have lactose intolerance. Other health promoting ingredients in raw milk include: Enzymes are deactivated when you get above degrees. It also contains phosphatase. Butterfat is also your best source of preformed vitamin A. By the time you get to Without them.

Healthy unoxidized cholesterol Conjugated linoleic acid CLA. Without butterfat. It is quite possible to build your squat poundage up to tremendous figures. A great method of building up strength and power as well as muscular size and thickness. One of the biggest mistakes made by many trainees is that they work too frequently with heavy one rep poundage. The idea here of course is for you to try and get five reps on all the last three heavy sets.

And so your strength should steadily increase over a period of time. Whichever routine you decide to follow remember that your results will be in direct proportion on how hard you SQUAT! In doing this you should workdown in reps and up in weight by doing the following: Com with any questions you may have or ideas for books you would like to see added to the site.

Please visit Www. Library of Bodybuilding Books Under Ten Dollars My belief and opinion is that every person interested in building a healthy. Com often so you can see what new books have been added to the site. You can contact me personally at Dan PowerHealthProducts. Like any well stocked library new books will be added as they become available. Teaches you how to build muscle in only weeks without illegal steroids or harmful side effects.

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