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The enchantress of florence pdf

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Enchantress of Florence is Rushdie's tenth novel published in The story of Qara Koz, a Mughal princess with magical powers in Florence. The novel is. the novel in Salman Rushdie's The Enchantress of Florence (). It narrates the visit of a mysterious stranger Mogor from Italy to the imperial capital of Akbar. download or read book online in pdf or epub. The Enchantress Of Florence is one of best books released on containing pages, this book written by.


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The Enchantress of Florence is the story of a mysterious woman, a great beauty believed to possess the powers of enchantment and sorcery, attempting to. Generated by ABC Amber LIT Converter, lesforgesdessalles.info Gwyneth Stevens Book II: THE ENCHANTRESS B. Editorial Reviews. lesforgesdessalles.info Review. Amazon Best of the Month, June Trying to describe a Salman Rushdie novel is like trying to describe music to.

Cloaked in sixteenth-century philosophical ideas, these ruminations may seem pompous or boring, but I found them intriguing. Only one man may hear my secret and live, and I would not want to be responsible for your death. The curse of the human race is not that we are so different from one another, but that we are so alike. Hardcover , pages. When Argalia returns home with his Mughal mistress the city is mesmerized by her presence, and much trouble ensues. There were soldiers on duty at the Hatyapul gate but their stances were relaxed. Dun dun dunnnnnnn!

One constantly questions which details are true and which are products of Rushdie's extraordinary imagination. Interestingly, Rushdie spent years researching this work and in interviews claims that much of what one might think the most fantastical - the Shi'a monarch who uses his enemy's skull as a drinking goblet or the Ottoman Caliph who's gardeners double as his executioners - are in fact the ones that are true.

On occasion on really wishes that there were a study guide to go along with the book. Like the best fairy tales, Rushdie's "Enchantress" layers in many deep and vexing questions that transcend any age: What does it mean to be real? What is the good life? How can one be happy? All of this arrives in a story written with such incomparable talent, that one can not easily put it down.

View all 11 comments. Welcome to realm where Story reigns, courtesy of the master of ceremony Salman Rushdie. In a somptuous palace of red stone dwells the absolute ruler of the world, the great Mughal Emperor Akbar the Great - warrior, philosopher, despot and lover. The Emperor will either heap gold on his head or throw him from the highest tower. Both Fatehpur Sikri and Florence come alive in multicolored landscapes, vibrant with life and symbolism. Even my local hero Vlad the Impaler has a couple of pages.

I am reminded of the extraordinary movie "The Fall" and indeed some of the locations, the unreliable narrator and the fantastic coincidences of fate can be found there.

It is easy to check with Wikipedia and find out that most of the facts presented here are true. Yet the world inhabited by the characters is not the one to be found in history books. The proponents of the "magical realism" school claim that reality is subjective, it is re-created daily through our imagination.

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It is stated more than once in this text: I took my time with it, returning and reading again and again some paragraphs. The plot takes sometimes second place, but here it is taster in the words of the storyteller: Argalia and Angelica were their names.

‘The Enchantress of Florence,’ by Salman Rushdie - The New York Times

Argalia bore enchanted weapons, and in his retinue were four terrifying giants, and by his side rode Angelica, the princess of Cathay and India, the most beautiful woman in the world, and an enchantress beyond compare. View all 8 comments. Jun 21, Bonnie rated it it was ok Shelves: I'm surprised with the hatred I feel towards this book. I mean, it's Salman frickin' Rushdie, right?

Isn't he some kind of literary god? I'm going to have to read his other books to see, because this one was trash. I've read sexist books before. But in this I'm surprised with the hatred I feel towards this book.

But in this book I cared not a whit about any character, the plot was leaden and the writing was so stilted and musty I thought for a bit it had to be a translated book, despite the fact that I know Rushdie writes in English. Basically, every woman in this is either an insecure shrew Machiavelli's wife, Akbar's wives or an empty vessel that men project their sexual fantasies on to. The Enchantress herself is basically powered by hotness. Her magic is her beauty.

The female servants in the book are literally their mistress' echo Gulbadan's servant or mirror the enchantress' servant thus devoiding them of the little personality that the other women get.

Of course, there's never any jealousy between the enchantress and the mirror over the second husband, nor is the mirror ever shown to care that her mistress basically whores her out to the second husband. That would require them to be presented as human, when really the women in this book are ciphers for male fantasies. I mean, for goodness sake, the Mughal's favorite wife who was an actual historical person is a figment of her husband's imagination who, despite this, is able to give him great sex.

And don't even get me started on the part of the book when all the women in the Mughal's city became petty and quarrelsome with each other, but were cured when they were ordered to walk around naked all day and realized they were all flawed and human uh The worst part of it all was that I got the feeling that Rushdie considered this book romantic. No wonder this guy has been married and divorced four times that is probably a low blow, but the fact that he obviously does not understand women as human beings comes across in this book incredibly strongly.

Also, why the heck did he include a bibliography? This book is completely a book of magical realism and so much of it is detached from reality and obviously NOT historical, you can't really trust any of it to be historically accurate unless you're familiar with the period and can judge for yourself what is real and what is false.

Is the bibliography just there to show off that he did in fact do research? Nov 09, Steven Godin rated it it was ok. This is the second time now I have abandoned a Rushdie novel, so in all likelihood I won't bother reading him again.

The fact I managed to get beyond the halfway point made me feel like I deserved a nice pat on the back. He is simply not a writer I hold in high regard anyway, and this twaddle just confirms that even stronger, as it's blatantly sexist, and an insult to women.

Things started out quite promising, before I drastically lost interest. If I ever came across Rushdie in person, I would like nothing more than to pelt him with eggs. View 2 comments. While every review seems a need to state the basic plot of the yellow-haired stranger appearing in Akbar's court I will quickly skip over this and go straight to what I thought.

I felt that the book was very uneven, there where parts that were just wonderful and deserving a full five stars, in particular the story of the illuminator who disappeared into his own artwork and the concept of Jhoda, and others that were so very boring that the average became a two.

The main problem I had was that it While every review seems a need to state the basic plot of the yellow-haired stranger appearing in Akbar's court I will quickly skip over this and go straight to what I thought. The main problem I had was that it was a very slow read due to the fact that at times it felt like a history book not surprising considering Rushdie's background and had so much historical detail crammed in that I felt I really needed a who's who guide and lots of maps just to fingure out what was going on.

Also the ending was a bit rushed and vague, and a bit ewwwww with the incest. I also had the opportunity to go to his book talk and signing for this book and I have to say that he did a wonderful job actually summing things up and I feel that his talk added alot to the book, laying out more clearly what the historical situation was like during the time of Akbar, and maybe if that had been infused into the book then I wouldn't have felt quite so lost sometimes.

View all 4 comments. Jun 05, Ben Babcock rated it really liked it Shelves: Rushdie possesses an uncanny ability to manipulate perspective. In his stories, the flow of time is always questionable, and subject to change--if it flows at all. And his characters are larger-than-life, capricious archetypes that embody the virtues and flaws of humanity. In this novel, Rushdie runs two stories parallel to each other: The boundaries between these two stories--the latter of which takes place in the first one's past--are flimsy, permeable.

If you were expecting a linear narrative that reads like a movie novelization, then you a have not read Salman Rushdie before and b will not get that. I might even characterize this story as a fable, for it carries that particular brand of enchantment about it. Romance, yes, that too: Cloaked in sixteenth-century philosophical ideas, these ruminations may seem pompous or boring, but I found them intriguing.

Akbar struggles with the existence of God, the divine right to rule, whether might truly is the only arbiter of power. We also see a fictionalized Machiavelli, disenchanted with his wife, and like so many men in this story, drawn into the web of enchantment that the eponymous princess weaves. Descend deeper through these layers, and Rushdie focuses on the nature of power for women in a world dominated by men.

How do women exert their influence? Is their beauty, their sexuality, the only way they can ever gain power? In this book, two female characters are essentially imaginary, constructed from the mind of Akbar. What does this say about the nature of gender, a man creating his feminine opposites because he cannot find them in life? Rushdie uses this story as a vehicle to explore a woman's life--told largely through the perspectives of men, ironically--in this period of history.

However, I wouldn't necessarily call this a work of historical fiction, in the sense that it does not concern itself too much with the details of history except when they serve a purpose. The story is not about the Mughal empire so much as it is set, for a part, in that empire. While "epic" or "sword and sorcery" fantasy has its place, its success of late has typecasted the genre. In those stories, magic is almost a science, subjected to laws the way we have restricted gravity.

We often forget that the definition of fantasy is broader. It is truly a fantastic adventure and romance just steeped in unrestrained magic, a world in which anything is possible--but not everything is permitted. View 1 comment. Jun 24, Scott Gates rated it did not like it. Filled with lush emptiness. There is more love-at-first-sight in the Enchantress than all other stories put together.

Entire cities fall in love at first sight. And the level of subtlety rarely rises above this. After a promising first 80 pages or so, it begins to resemble a cartoon in a bad way. Even the blasphemies in this book—-which seemed to be produced by Rushdie perfunctorily, like a band that always makes sure to play its most popular song—-are wooden and innocuous.

As the reviewer put it: Feb 22, Becky rated it liked it Recommended to Becky by: When this book was chosen for my real life bookclub, I was a little nervous about it. I'd never read anything of Salman Rushdie's before, and I wouldn't have chosen this one to start with if ever.

I'll be honest, the premise looks kind of boring. But then I started reading it. And I was completely surprised by not only how much I liked it, but by how funny it was. Irreverent, and witty, and whimsical and a little weird, with more than a dash of gutter-humor funny that had me giggling like a fi When this book was chosen for my real life bookclub, I was a little nervous about it.

Irreverent, and witty, and whimsical and a little weird, with more than a dash of gutter-humor funny that had me giggling like a fiend. I was loving it. I loved Akbar, Akbar the Great, the greatness of which must be twice specified in order to merely hint at his glorious gloriousness. I loved his personality, his unpredictability, his mind. I loved how he thought about things Honestly, it is so rare for a ruler to think about the nature of his or her rule in terms other than 1 how to keep it, and 2 how to get more of it.

I loved that he thought in the abstract, the philosophical. I vs we. All "I"s are "we"s, not just Royal "we"s. Everyone is part of a larger entity that makes them up: Perhaps the idea of self-as-community was what it meant to be a being in the world, any being; such a being being, after all, inevitably a being among other beings, a part of the beingness of all things.

It's interesting, and uniquely worded, and it made me giggle to read it in what, before starting, I assumed would be a seriously dull book.

We enjoyed his blunt honesty too, in acknowledging that his kids, whom he loves, are royal bastards who will try to usurp his rule. He loved them. They would betray him. They were the lights of his life.

They would come while he slept. The little assfuckers. He was waiting for their moves. We loved him. For the first half. And then it shifted.

Then that yellow-haired guy had to show up and tell his secret that is so momentous that to tell it to the wrong person would cause the listener's death. Dun dun dunnnnnnn! Except it wasn't. The secret was A family history that leached almost all the humor and life out of the 2nd half of the book. Not all Suddenly we have this new cast list, and though they try to be interesting, to me they just weren't.

They didn't compare to Akbar. Recognizable names, sure, but I wasn't really feeling them despite that. I wanted to get back to "the present" and spend more time with Akbar. He made the story interesting to me. Qara Koz was Honestly, I don't get her allure - or, to be honest, the allure of any of the other "Oh so beautiful that one look upon her face makes men ready to just keel over and die for her" women mentioned in the story.

We have one that's so perfect she's literally imaginary, but doesn't even have the decency to stop existing when her imaginer is away. We have another who is so beautiful that basking in her haughty condescension is considered a luxury, and one who is so amazingly gorgeous that everyone in town's had a share except her husband.

But maybe Qara Koz is actually literally enchanting them, as opposed to just being so pretty that men fall down at her feet. I'm a little iffy on that point. That's magical realism for you. I'm not sure how I felt about this book, overall.

I wanted to love it, and for the first half, I did There's the underlying question of a woman's power and influence, but I feel a bit bothered by the fact that every woman in this book either a had none, b had a little that was granted by a man, c obtained it strictly based on her looks, or d used magic.

Another reason why I loved Akbar In fact the main men were like this and valued more than just appearance They are imperfect, I know To shift gears a little, I will say I quite enjoyed the kind of modern feel to the narration.

The story is set in the 16th century, but the language was accessible and straightforward, while at the same time being somehow more. I'm not really sure how to explain it, but it was gorgeous and easy to read and descriptive, and at times really funny, as I mentioned before.

‘The Enchantress of Florence’

There was also an interesting duality in this story I thought that this was interesting, but it wasn't enough. There was quite a bit to enjoy in this book. I just wish that the story-within-the-story interested me more. But, in fairness, this isn't one of my favorite things to begin with. I definitely think I'll try another of Rushdie's books though. View all 3 comments. Gereksiz oyunlara da yer verilmiyor. Jul 16, Kelly rated it liked it Shelves: This would have been far better served by being a Silk type novella, an incantation that weaves its charms around us for the duration of one sitting- just long enough for the magic to work, not long enough for anyone to even think of wanting to look behind the curtain.

The longer it went on, and the more tied to the reality of the world it became, the less it worked. So much of this could have been left to the readers to dream and imagine afterwards. So many subplots about hookers and pages of r This would have been far better served by being a Silk type novella, an incantation that weaves its charms around us for the duration of one sitting- just long enough for the magic to work, not long enough for anyone to even think of wanting to look behind the curtain.

This is a story about the power of stories- I get that unraveling it a little is part of the point, but this book needed to trust that its audience got it about pages sooner than it thought we did.

Gorgeous, gorgeous writing that I would like to have been top on my list to talk about and quote at length might then have taken its proper place.

The Enchantress of Florence

But by the end, even that was too much of a good thing. What a shame, what a world. Less is more. Jun 05, Lori rated it really liked it. Reading this is like eating a bowl of creamy ice cream.

Luscious words that seem to slide down and enervate but tastefully lingers to remind you it's not as light as you first thought. Reading Rushdie is like a spark of recognition with a fellow traveler and I tip my hat in greeting, to say hello!

Is it plausible? Certainly, within the context of magical realism, of which Rushdie is always a master, and so there is internal plausibility and satisfactory resolution, if an ongoing story can ever truly be resolved. The story is not only an exploration of history itself but also a contemplation on the nature of imagination, creation, the relationship between God and humanity, freedom and authoritarianism, all presenting Rushdie with the opportunity to speak in the voice and style that is all his own and an enchantment to the reader.

I loved the book. Jan 27, Patricia Nedelea rated it it was amazing. To me, the enchantress seems like one of the most charming female characters ever. Magical, a bit scary, unforgettable. Her story is totally worth reading. Aug 30, Krista rated it really liked it Shelves: The curse of the human race is not that we are so different from one another, but that we are so alike.

Between Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses , Rushdie has probably already said everything import The curse of the human race is not that we are so different from one another, but that we are so alike. Between Midnight's Children and The Satanic Verses , Rushdie has probably already said everything important that he needed to say, so the fault is mine for picking up a book that I knew might slightly disappoint; I'd give this one three and a half stars if I could and am rounding up because the storyline did keep me engaged.

Only one man may hear my secret and live, and I would not want to be responsible for your death. I have danced with Baron Samedi on the Day of the Dead and survived his voodoo howls. I will take it most unkindly if you do not tell me everything at once. Angelica, a princess of the blood royal of Genghis Khan and Tamerlane No, go on. There's a nice bit of tension as we suspect the stranger's motives, but Akbar is no fool: No matter how amused or intrigued he appears to be by the young man's tales, the emperor is wary and assessing; and although it takes several hundred pages of misdirection and tangled timelines to hear the entire story that Vespucci came to relate, Akbar is always one step ahead; ultimately intuiting the truth of Vespucci's personal history before even the young man himself does.

For that is really the essence of this book: Their boyhood world was a magic wood.

Pdf of the enchantress florence

And maybe I should have been offended by that if not for this scene that sees a Medici proving himself immune to the princess' charms, if not her political value, by proposing that she should ally herself with him after her husband's impending murder: Music struck up. There was to be dancing now. She was to dance a pavana with the assassin of her hopes. You know how the world works. Hard to be offended by the dismissive treatment of women in a quasi-realistic historical novel even if, after reading Joseph Anton , I figure Rushdie doesn't like women too much.

The bottom line: There were some really nice passages in this book, an intriguing overall structure even if the ending was a bit of a let down , an enchanting fairy tale vibe, a blending of history and myth; much to like.

On the other hand, there was something a bit self-satisfied about the storyteller-as-creator-of-reality that made me impatient with the author himself.

My first read for Rushdie …well , I was confused how to rate this book. This does not mean that I hardly liked it. No ,it is just that there were parts deserved 5 starts for me while other parts simply irritated me!!! I do recommend it , and I highly appreciate the work that has been done in this novel, I totally understand the declaration that it took him years to write this one. Even as reader he pushed me searching and thirsty for more about the subject!

Certainly a beautiful yarn to gather east and west together in a significant point of history , I believe that this quote from the novel: Not that we are different from one anther , but we are so alike.

Home [Read Online] Audrey, Wait! The Enchantress Of Florence was published by on. This book was very surprised because of its 3. The Enchantress Of Florence book tell us the storyline about: A tall, yellow-haired young European traveller calling himself 'Mogor dell'Amore', the Mughal of Love, arrives at the court of the real Grand Mughal, the Emperor Akbar, with a tale to tell that begins to obsess the whole imperial capital.

The stranger claims to be the child of a lost Mughal princess, the youngest sister of Akbar's grandfather Babar: Qara Koz, 'Lady Black Eyes', a great beauty believed to possess powers of enchantment and sorcery, who is taken captive first by an Uzbek warlord, then by the Shah of Persia, and finally becomes the lover of a certain Argalia, a Florentine soldier of fortune, commander of the armies of the Ottoman Sultan.

When Argalia returns home with his Mughal mistress the city is mesmerized by her presence, and much trouble ensues. It brings together two cities that barely know each other - the hedonistic Mughal capital, in which the brilliant emperor wrestles daily with questions of belief, desire and the treachery of sons, and the equally sensual Florentine world of powerful courtesans, humanist philosophy and inhuman torture, where Argalia's boyhood friend "il Machia" - Niccolo' Machiavelli - is learning, the hard way, about the true brutality of power.

These two worlds, so far apart, turn out to be uncannily alike, and the enchantments of women hold sway over them both.